Lego baby gender reveal

Lego model pregnancy baby gender reveal

Is this the most gruesome Lego playset ever?

A Lego-mad dad built a representation of his pregnant wife’s stomach and invited friends and family to pull it apart as a way to share the news of the gender of their child.

Gerry Burrows, 41, a computer engineer, decided the building blocks were the best medium through which to share the news that his wife Susanne, 34, would be giving birth to their daughter Amelia, now six months old, by cesarean section.

The set has become the favourite plaything of the couple’s eldest daughter Ella May, three.

Mr Burrows, of Limerick, Pennsylvania, said: “It’s a woman represented from the neck down and the upper thigh up.

“I had it so you could take off two layers of the stomach, then you had to pull out some of the insides, so it’s fairly gruesome.

“They could find the baby in there, attached to the umbilical chord, with a pink diaper and a pink bow, so they could tell we were having a girl.

“Everyone was delighted when they caught on to what we were telling them.”

The playset, which is made of approximately 400 bricks, took three hours to build. Mr Burrows completed it to share the news that a scan had revealed the gender of their baby, who would go on to be born in July 2014.

The scene also includes a washing station and weighing table, as well as surgical instruments.

“It’s become my older daughter’s favourite thing to play with, even though I’m not sure it’s entirely suitable for kids. Where the legs are cut off you can see the bone, and the woman doesn’t have a head, so it’s a little gruesome.

“She likes to play with it and pretend her baby sister is being born again. She uses the washing station, weighing station, and incubator to care for the baby. She also plays with the baby with her other Lego and Duplo sets.”

Mr Burrows, a lifelong Lego fan, spends hours building structures from the toy bricks, improvising the designs in his head as he goes along.

He said: “It was difficult to get the scale right. I couldn’t use a minifig for the baby because it simply would have been too small. In the end I had to build one from scratch.

“It was a good thing I had enough skin colored pieces, which are not common. I have a very large supply of well-organized Lego sorted by size and color so I didn’t spend a lot of time trying to find certain pieces.

“Susanne loves it. She thought the severed body parts were funny, although she wasn’t sure about me putting the nipples on it, especially for showing to older family members and church friends.

“In the end, it went over well with everyone who saw it. I think it’s hard to be too offended by Lego nipples.”

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