Smoking addiction graphs

Graph tracking cigarettes smoked

An ex-smoker has brought together a series of fascinating and beautiful graphs from data which he collected to help him quit.

Riley Murphy, 30, a chemist, started recording facts about his smoking habit in October 2001 and finished in July 2003. He went on to record 5,326 cigarette trips over that two-year period, writing down notes on scraps of paper he carried in his pocket.

Although Mr Murphy quit smoking in 2012, it was only this year that he finished turning his data into visual graphs.

The resulting study give a fascinating insight into the patterns and rhythms of nicotine addiction.

Mr Murphy said: “I wasn’t ready to quit at the time, but I didn’t want to become a slave to the habit.

“Sometimes I’d go a day without a cigarette, and I wanted to know if that made me smoke even more the next day.

“That’s why I plotted a weekly average against a daily tally. I was surprised to see my overall smoking stayed fairly constant.”

The graphs also note what time of day Mr Murphy, of Pennsylvania in the USA, smoked and the amount of time he left between cigarettes.

He said: “Looking at it now I’m surprised my total smoking didn’t increase.

“I know from experience that once I had one, I would start smoking them faster and faster, but it was hard to pull out much from the graphs apart from they were more frequent at certain times when I smoked the most.”

More high resolution pictures are available on request. To discuss rates for using pictures and copy, contact us on 0117 9733730 or contact@medavia.co.uk.

Related posts

Top

Need help? Email Us Here! Chat online now with Medavia

← Prev Step

Thanks for contacting us. We'll get back to you as soon as we can.

Please provide a valid name, email, and question.

Powered by LivelyChat
Powered by LivelyChat Delete History